annoying words

Words I Don’t Like

Some words at their mere utterance herald an event or request that I know is going to make me grind my teeth.  The three most offensive words are “cute,” “should” and “need.

Cute: 

Why do some people refer to older women as “cute”? Why not attractive, handsome, stylish, lighthearted or comical?

I don’t like it when someone describes an older woman as “cute”. The word has a tendency to diminish the capabilities and accomplishments of an older woman. It infers you are no longer in the game.

How many intelligent women are referred to as “cute”? Kittens are cute; puppies are cute; babies are “cute.” Cartoonish little old ladies depictions are not “cute.”

Sometimes difficult, ditzy, witchy and cranky are appropriate. Better to be described as “difficult” rather than “cute.” At the very least, if you are difficult, you are still out there.

Should:

I get anxious when I hear “should.” I just know I am going to hear about one of my shortcomings. The word implies action is required to correct a major failing. Other times it is given as a warning to prevent a horrible blooper.

It is often used in the Doctor’s office as an admonishment to adopt a healthier lifestyle. Why can’t he simply tell me to exercise, go on a diet and omit the “should”?

Who gets to decide “shoulds”? Are there special qualifications for “should issuers”? Is there some sort of requirement or certification prior to issuing “shoulds”? It seems to me that more often than not these self-appointed gurus might consider addressing their own issues prior to telling the rest of us what we “should” do.

Need:

A friend told me my use of the word “need” really irks her. She feels it falls into the same category as “should”. After careful consideration, I decided she is correct. “Need” is “should” kicked up a notch and vastly more offensive.

It implies more urgent action is required immediately. I am relieved she pointed this out to me. It is a failing I “need” to correct. Perhaps I “should” be relieved if she chooses to describe me as “cute” as opposed to curmudgeon.

Note: Originally Published October 2011

Words I Don’t Like

Some words at their mere utterance herald an event or request that I know is going to make me grind my teeth.  The three most offensive words are “cute”, “should” and “need.

Cute: 

Why do some people refer to older women as “cute”? Why not attractive, handsome, stylish, lighthearted or comical?

When someone describes an older woman as “cute”, I don’t like it. The word has a tendency to diminish the capabilities and accomplishments of an older woman. It infers you are no longer in the game.

How many intelligent women are referred to as “cute”? Kittens are cute; puppies are cute; babies are “cute.” Cartoonish little old ladies depictions are not “cute.”

Sometimes difficult, ditzy, witchy and cranky are appropriate. I’d rather be described as “difficult” than “cute.” At the very least, if you are difficult, you are still out there.

Should:

I get anxious when I hear “should.” I just know I am going to hear about one of my shortcomings. The word implies action is required to correct a major failing. Other times it is given as a warning to prevent a horrible blooper.

It is often used in the Doctor’s office as an admonishment to adopt a healthier lifestyle. Why can’t he simply tell me to exercise, go on a diet and omit the “should”?

Who gets to decide “shoulds”? Are there special qualifications for “should issuers”? Is there some sort of requirement or certification prior to issuing “shoulds”? It seems to me that more often than not these self-appointed gurus might consider addressing their own issues prior to telling the rest of us what we “should” do.

Need:

A friend told me my use of the word “need” really irks her. She feels it falls into the same category as “should”. After careful consideration, I decided she is correct. “Need” is “should” kicked up a notch and vastly more offensive.

It implies more urgent action is required immediately. I am relieved she pointed this out to me. It is a failing I “need” to correct. Perhaps I “should” be relieved if she chooses to describe me as “cute” as opposed to curmudgeon.

If You Will And Other Annoying Phrases

“If you will”, is one of the most annoying phrases on the planet.

It seems I hear or read the phrase almost daily. What does it mean?

Maybe you are half-heartedly offering an opinion that you are not entirely comfortable with.
Are you asking your listener to endorse the ambiguity of your remark?
Perhaps you attempting to impress someone.

The term is overused and pretentious. What would happen if I responded, “I will not”?

“Beg to differ” is downright spineless.

Don’t beg. Disagree or have a fist fight, but don’t beg. My personal view is people who use this phrase are being condescending and don’t give a hoot about your sensibilities. I think a knock upside their noggin might be in order.

I don’t understand the phrase “thinking outside the box”

My thoughts don’t live in a box. Most of the time they are all over the place. It would be more efficient if they were filed away in a box, ready to spring into action when I need them. When asked for a creative solution or a different approach, the thought would hop out of the box, ready for action.

I’ve been asked to add “my bad”.

This clunker originated around 1970. It’s in the same category as “totally” and “like”. Women over six years of age should never use these words as adjectives. If you want to label yourself as lacking ability in any attempt other than chewing gum, feel free to continue usage.

I believed “awesome” indicated something original and exciting.

Just as I’m all set to hear about something unique, most of the time “awesome” describes events, objects or actions that are not. Dark chocolate is awesome. Most of the other stuff to which “awesome” is attributed is not.

What the heck does it mean when someone has “issues?”

Are they ill? Do they have a phobia of some sort? I never know what I am supposed to do or say after being warned a person has “issues”.

I’m going to totally like retreat, if you will until I get my adjective issues under control.

If you beg to differ, feel free to leave a comment.

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